Celebrating the UCT Community of Hope Vaccination Centre

27 July 2022 | Story Nicole Forrest. Photo Nasief Manie. Read time 7 min.
Staff from UCT and the provincial Department of Health came together on Wednesday, 20 July, at the UCT Community of Hope Vaccination Centre to celebrate the site’s successes.
Staff from UCT and the provincial Department of Health came together on Wednesday, 20 July, at the UCT Community of Hope Vaccination Centre to celebrate the site’s successes.

On Wednesday, 20 July, staff from the University of Cape Town’s (UCT) Faculty of Health Sciences came together with representatives from the Western Cape Government at the UCT Community of Hope Vaccination Centre at Forest Hill Residence to acknowledge the centre’s significance in the fight against COVID-19 and to thank its staff for their contributions.

The centre opened on 1 September 2021 with the aim of providing quality vaccination services to UCT staff, students and the nearby communities, as well as to create an opportunity for medical students from the Faculty of Health Sciences to gain practical public health skills.

“We had three key objectives for the Community of Hope Vaccination Centre. One, we wanted to deliver high-quality, dependable and accessible vaccination services to the UCT student population. Secondly, we wanted to provide efficient vaccination access to underserved schools, businesses and people from the surrounding community.

“Thirdly, we wanted to offer a platform to support the Faculty of Health Sciences and its undergraduates to gain practical and demonstrable skills, and to see public health in action,” explained Dr Kathryn Grammer, southern and western director for the provincial Department of Health.

 

“Many people have contacted us individually and said, ‘Thank you’, because of the dignity and respect they were treated with.”

The centre has no doubt achieved these objectives, with a total of 26 413 vaccinations administered and hundreds of medical students educated in the 45 weeks since the service opened. What’s more, it has been a firm favourite among testing centres due to the warm reception and professional service provided by its staff.

“Many people have contacted us individually and said, ‘Thank you’, because of the dignity and respect they were treated with when they visited,” said Western Cape Government health and wellness chief operating officer, Dr Saadiq Kariem.

Faculty of Health Sciences Deputy Dean: Undergraduate Studies, Dr Kerrin Begg, emphasised this point, sharing her personal experience of having used the centre’s services. “I came in for my own vaccinations. I brought my children in for the vaccinations. I brought my parents … And I have to say that, personally, my own experience was just that this was just the best vaccination centre.”

A teaching and learning success

According to Dr Begg, the ability to train future healthcare workers to learn through service was one of the greatest opportunities presented by the centre. “One of the things we did during COVID-19, when students were initially pulled off the platform, was to start to conceive of this idea of learning through serving and serving through learning. Students still had to learn to be nurses and doctors, so they still needed exposure. 

“So, the ability [of] our students to come into this space and be able to administer vaccinations to the public as part of this campaign was just an incredible opportunity that we are so grateful for,” she said.

 

“Part of having students in the space was also to show them that this really wasn’t something to be afraid of.”

In addition to being an instrument of learning, the centre has also been key in helping to fight misinformation surrounding the vaccines and encourage uptake of the inoculation – not only among members of the public, but also student healthcare workers.

“Part of having students in the space was also to show them that this really wasn’t something to be afraid of,” Begg noted.

The value added by this education among both students and the public, said Dr Grammer, was priceless. “What was amazing about this project is that, really quickly, we mobilised working with the Faculty of Health Sciences to embed students into direct service delivery. 

“Students engaged with clients as part of a multi-disciplinary team where they could support, educate and provide additional information after the procedure about how to deal with any post-vaccination effects, should there be any. 

“That built trust with the students and evoked trust in the managers and cemented that there’s a way of doing things where you can both train and learn and provide direct key services to clients coming into the system. I think that is empowering and it made the students feel very valued,” she said.

Modelling future collaborations

In addition to the opportunities for teaching and learning opened up by the Community of Hope Vaccination Centre, it has also provided an excellent basis on which future collaborative projects between UCT and the Western Cape Government can be modelled.

“Particularly from the faculty and the university, the partnership was really an incredible opportunity to explore new ways of teaching and partnering. The centre has really been a model for how we can do things going forward.

“We really look forward to the department and us doing more collaborative projects that look at wellness initiatives in the future,” said Begg.

This sentiment was echoed by Dr Kariem. “The relationship between UCT and the Western Cape Government goes back many years – between individuals and between the institutions – and although the centre is now closing, there are already conversations about how this relationship can be strengthened and deepened.

“We know that this was a model of how we can work together, between the university and the province, in terms of our joint projects; how training could be conducted, how students could intervene in other areas,” he noted.

“Being forced to look at things slightly differently because of the pandemic has driven us to strengthen this bilateral relationship between UCT and the province, as well as other universities and the province. This centre, for me, exemplifies that we can actually achieve that.”

Moving forward with hope

While the vaccination centre will cease operations on 29 July, Grammer emphasised the importance of continuing to encourage the public to get vaccinated against COVID-19 and keep their inoculation up to date with booster shots.

“Although the centre is closing, there still needs to be an emphasis on encouraging people to have their primary doses as well as boosters. Although [positive test results] and hospitalisation are both low at the moment, we don’t know what’s around the corner with new variants.

“Natural immunity and vaccine immunity have a limited lifespan, so we need to be encouraging everybody to get vaccinated to protect themselves from hospitalisation,” she explained.


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UCT’s response to COVID-19

COVID-19 is a global pandemic that caused President Cyril Ramaphosa to declare a national disaster in South Africa on 15 March 2020 and to implement a national lockdown from 26 March 2020. UCT is taking the threat of infection in our university community extremely seriously, and this page will be updated with the latest COVID-19 information. Please note that the information on this page is subject to change depending on current lockdown regulations.

Minister of Health, Dr Joe Phaahla, has in June 2022 repealed some of South Africa’s remaining COVID-19 regulations: namely, sections 16A, 16B and 16C of the Regulations Relating to the Surveillance and the Control of Notifiable Medical Conditions under the National Health Act. We are now no longer required to wear masks or limit gatherings. Venue restrictions and checks for travellers coming into South Africa have now also been removed.

 

Campus communications

 
2022

Adjusting to our new environment 16:50, 23 June 2022
VC Open Lecture and other updates 17:04, 13 April 2022
Feedback from UCT Council meeting of 12 March 2022 09:45, 18 March 2022
Chair of Council
March 2022 graduation celebration 16:45, 8 March 2022
Report on the meeting of UCT Council of 21 February 2022 19:30, 21 February 2022
Chair of Council
COVID-19 management 2022 11:55, 14 February 2022
Return to campus arrangements 2022 11:15, 4 February 2022

UCT Community of Hope Vaccination Centre

On Wednesday, 20 July, staff from the University of Cape Town’s (UCT) Faculty of Health Sciences came together with representatives from the Western Cape Government at the UCT Community of Hope Vaccination Centre at Forest Hill Residence to acknowledge the centre’s significance in the fight against COVID-19 and to thank its staff for their contributions. The centre opened on 1 September 2021 with the aim of providing quality vaccination services to UCT staff, students and the nearby communities, as well as to create an opportunity for medical students from the Faculty of Health Sciences to gain practical public health skills. The vaccination centre ceased operations on Friday, 29 July 2022.

With the closure of the UCT Community of Hope Vaccination Centre, if you still require access to a COVID-19 vaccination site please visit the CovidComms SA website to find an alternative.

 

“After almost a year of operation, the University of Cape Town’s (UCT) Community of Hope Vaccination Centre, located at the Forest Hill residence complex in Mowbray, will close on Friday, 29 July 2022. I am extremely grateful and proud of all staff, students and everyone involved in this important project.”
– Vice-Chancellor Prof Mamokgethi Phakeng

With the closure of the UCT Community of Hope Vaccination Centre, if you still require access to a COVID-19 vaccination site please visit the CovidComms SA website to find an alternative.


Thank You UCT Community

Frequently asked questions

 

Global Citizen Asks: Are COVID-19 Vaccines Safe & Effective?

UCT’s Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine (IDM) collaborated with Global Citizen, speaking to trusted experts to dispel vaccine misinformation.



If you have further questions about the COVID-19 vaccine check out the FAQ produced by the Desmond Tutu Health Foundation (DTHF). The DTHF has developed a dedicated chat function where you can ask your vaccine-related questions on the bottom right hand corner of the website.

IDM YouTube channel | IDM website
 

 

“As a contact university, we look forward to readjusting our undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in 2023 as the COVID-19 regulations have been repealed.”
– Prof Harsha Kathard, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor: Teaching and Learning

We are continuing to monitor the situation and we will be updating the UCT community regularly – as and when there are further updates. If you are concerned or need more information, students can contact the Student Wellness Service on 021 650 5620 or 021 650 1271 (after hours), while staff can contact 021 650 5685.

 

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