Parenting out-of-school children during COVID-19

26 March 2020 | Story Supplied. Photo CDC, Unsplash. Read time 2 min.
The newly downloadable one-pagers offer great advice for parents in the time of COVID-19 and confinement.
The newly downloadable one-pagers offer great advice for parents in the time of COVID-19 and confinement.

With 1.37 billion children now out of school – nearly 80% of all enrolled children in the world – parents and carers across the globe are rapidly coming to terms with the challenges of parenting in the time of COVID-19. Parenting is made harder by uncertainty, stress and economic hardship.

Parenting for Lifelong Health and the United Kingdom Research and Innovation (UKRI) Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) Accelerating Achievement for Africa’s Adolescents (Accelerate) Hub have produced a set of six one-page tips for parents.

These sheets cover planning one-on-one time, staying positive, creating a daily routine, avoiding bad behaviour, managing stress and talking about COVID-19. They are the result of a partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF, the Internet of Good Things, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USAID and the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children.

 

Keeping your usual rules and routines in your household is especially important for children right now: it will help them feel safe.

Available from the WHO and UNICEF, the downloadable one-pagers contain great advice condensed from their non-commercial evidence-based parenting programmes and adapted to fit these extraordinary times. Volunteers are translating the sheets into more than 50 languages. These translations are available on covid19parenting.com.

“Keeping your usual rules and routines in your household is especially important for children right now: it will help them feel safe,” says Professor Cathy Ward from the UCT Department of Psychology. “It’ll help the grown-ups, too: we all need to know where we stand, and normal routines are a big help with that.”

Parenting for Lifelong Health is a suite of culturally adaptable, not-for-profit and well-tested parenting programmes for strengthening parent-child relationships and promoting child wellbeing. Developed by researchers from the University of Cape Town (UCT), Stellenbosch University and institutions in the United Kingdom with the WHO, UNICEF and community-based organisations, the programmes are designed to be offered on a large scale in low-resource settings.

The UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub is led by an interdisciplinary team at Oxford University and UCT, with partners worldwide. It aims to discover the combinations of services that can most efficiently and cost-effectively help adolescents achieve their potential across multiple life domains: health, education, employment and safety.


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Please view the republishing articles page for more information.


Research & innovation




UCT aspires to become a premier academic meeting point between South Africa, the rest of Africa and the world. Taking advantage of expanding global networks and our distinct vantage point in Africa, we are committed , through innovative research and scholarship, to grapple with the key issues of our natural and social worlds. We are committed both to protecting and encouraging 'curiosity-driven research' and research that has a real impact on our communities and environment.



 

 




 
TOP