Remapping Africa through peace parks

27 October 2017 | Story Yusuf Omar. Photo Pixabay.
The /Ai/Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park spans some of the most spectacular arid and desert mountain scenery in southern Africa.
The /Ai/Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park spans some of the most spectacular arid and desert mountain scenery in southern Africa.

Please note: this lecture has been postponed.

UCT’s Professor Maano Ramutsindela, an expert on political geography and political ecology, will deliver his inaugural lecture on 1 November 2017 in lecture theatre TS2B in the Snape Building on upper campus.

Ramutsindela, who is deputy dean of the Faculty of Science, has a background in human geography with a particular interest in South Africa’s socio-political and development challenges and the world economy. Through his research themes – which relate to borders, regions, land reform and transfrontier conservation – he engages with the broader debate on the conceptions and institutionalisation of borders and their (im)materiality, territorial politics, regionalisms and society–nature relations.

His inaugural lecture is titled “Remapping Africa through peace parks: What future for the continent?”

The establishment and development of peace parks, also known as transfrontier conservation areas, is an approach to jointly manage natural resources across political boundaries.

In his lecture, Ramutsindela will discuss the development of peace parks in Africa’s borderlands, the future they promise, their implications for the ownership of resources, as well as how ordinary people experience them. He will also explore whether peace parks are just a new cartographic device by which a colonial project of resource alienation and control is continued in post-independence Africa.


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